SEC Filings

10-Q
CRAY INC filed this Form 10-Q on 10/30/2018
Entire Document
 


We are required to evaluate our internal control over financial reporting under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 at the end of each fiscal year, and any adverse results from such future evaluations could result in a loss of investor confidence in our financial reports and have an adverse effect on our stock price. Pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, we are required to furnish a report by our management and a report by our independent registered public accounting firm on our internal control over financial reporting in our annual reports on Form 10-K as to whether we have any material weaknesses in our internal controls over financial reporting. Depending on their nature and severity, any future material weaknesses could result in our having to restate financial statements, could make it difficult or impossible for us to obtain an audit of our annual financial statements or could result in a qualification of any such audit. In such events, we could experience a number of adverse consequences, including our inability to comply with applicable reporting and listing requirements, a loss of market confidence in our publicly available information, delisting from The Nasdaq Global Market, an inability to complete a financing, loss of other financing sources such as our line of credit, and litigation based on the events themselves or their consequences.
Our reported financial results may be adversely affected by changes in accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Generally accepted accounting principles in the United States are subject to interpretation by the Financial Accounting Standards Board, the SEC and various bodies formed to promulgate and interpret appropriate accounting principles. A change in these principles or interpretations could have a significant effect on our reported financial results, and could affect the reporting of transactions completed before the announcement of a change.
U.S. federal income tax reform could adversely affect us. On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was signed into law, enacting a broad range of changes to the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, among other things, includes changes to U.S. federal tax rates, imposes significant additional limitations on the deductibility of interest and net operating losses, allows for the expensing of certain capital expenditures and puts into effect a number of changes impacting operations outside of the United States. In the fourth quarter of 2017, we reduced our deferred tax asset by approximately $28.9 million as a result. The Company will continue to assess the impact of the new tax legislation on its net deferred tax assets and liabilities and will continue to examine the impact this tax legislation may have on our business.
Provisions of our Restated Articles of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws could make a proposed acquisition of our business that is not approved by our Board of Directors more difficult. Provisions of our Restated Articles of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws could make it more difficult for a third-party to acquire us. These provisions could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for our common stock. For example, our Restated Articles of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws provide for:
removal of a director only in limited circumstances and only upon the affirmative vote of not less than two-thirds of the shares entitled to vote to elect directors;
the ability of our Board of Directors to issue up to 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock, without shareholder approval, with rights senior to those of the common stock;
no cumulative voting of shares;
the right of shareholders to call a special meeting of the shareholders only upon demand by the holders of not less than 30% of the shares entitled to vote at such a meeting;
the affirmative vote of not less than two-thirds of the outstanding shares entitled to vote on an amendment, unless the amendment was approved by a majority of our continuing directors, who are defined as directors who have either served as a director since August 31, 1995, or were nominated to be a director by the continuing directors;
special voting requirements for mergers and other business combinations, unless the proposed transaction was approved by a majority of continuing directors;
special procedures to bring matters before our shareholders at our annual shareholders’ meeting; and
special procedures to nominate members for election to our Board of Directors.
These provisions could delay, defer or prevent a merger, consolidation, takeover or other business transaction between us and a third-party that is not approved by our Board of Directors.


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